Academics at CCNY EAS

The EAS department is a highly interdisciplinary and graduate students have the ability to take a wide variety of courses both within and outside the EAS department for credit towards their degree. The selection of courses taken is often guided by an interest in one of several general topics, or “tracks,” offered by the department.

Each student should devise a course plan together with the graduate advisor and their research advisor (for thesis-option students) during their first semester. Examples of classes offered for some common tracks are provided below. Note that the schedule of classes varies, and not all the classes listed below may be available. Course Descriptions and Syllabi on regularly offered EAS Classes are also provided below. MS and PhD students can take classes at any CUNY school through the E-permit system. Through the Inter-University Doctoral Consortium, PhD students can take classes at Columbia University, Princeton, Rutgers, Stony Brook and elsewhere. World class faculty, resources, and affordable tuition make CCNY a great place to pursue a graduate degree. Additional resources for students are on our student resources page

EAS Tracks

Atmospheric science & climate

Graduate courses in atmospheric science offered at CCNY include Atmospheric Dynamics, Climate and Climate Change, Satellite Meteorology, Statistical Analysis for the Atmosphere, and Thermodynamics. Students are encouraged to take courses on remote sensing and hydrology offered by EAS and the Engineering department at CCNY.

Terrestrial & Coastal Ecology

For information on course options offered in Terrestrial & Coastal Ecology, contact Kyle McDonald or Maria Tzortziou.

Geochemistry & Environmental Chemistry

For information on course options offered in Geochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, contact Karin Block, Zhengrong Wang or Pengfei Zhang.

Geology & Geophysics

Graduate courses in Geology offered at CCNY include Sedimentology, Geomorphology, Mineralogy, Petrology, Structural Geology, Geotectonics, Geophysics, Global Environmental Hazards, Environmental Geophysics, Geochemistry, EAS Seminar, and Independent Study. Students are additionally encouraged to take advantage of graduate-level classes on specialized geology topics at Queens College and Brooklyn College. Possibilities include Advanced Igneous Petrology (Queens College), Metamorphic Petrology/Geochronology (Queens College), Global Tectonics (Brooklyn College), Advanced Ore Deposit Geology Seminar (Brooklyn College), and Field Studies (Queens College).

E-Permits

EAS graduate students can apply up to 9 credits toward their degree from classes offered at other CUNY campuses by obtaining an E-permit. Information about E-permits can be found here. The E-permit procedure is described here. Note that for Fall 2017 students should fill out a paper version of the E-permit form rather than using the on-line form.

CCNY Graduate Catalogue

Click here to peruse the CCNY graduate catalogue.

Academic Calendar

Click here for calendars of recent and upcoming semesters.

Course descriptions

The classes below are commonly offered graduate classes in EAS. For some of the entries, information is also provided regarding which semester(s) the class is typically offered.

Geomorphology
As the wind blows and the rain pelts and glaciers grind, the shape of the Earth’s surface gradually changes. These changes affect everything from the flow of the Hudson River to the rocks in Central Park to how long it takes you to walk to class. This course offers a quantitative examination of the processes that shape landscapes. Topics include weathering; glacial, fluvial, and aeolian erosion; mass wasting; runoff generation; and surface processes on other planets. Generally offered each spring semester. 3 cr.

EAS A1300: Environmental Geochemistry
Shallow earth interactions in ESS emphasizing: groundwater geochemistry; elemental cycles linked to biological activity in the oceans; geochemistry and global climate cycles; geo-bioremediation; and applied analytical techniques including x-ray diffraction, potentiometric titrations, and aspects of UV/visible spectroscopy. 3 lect., 1 lab hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS A2300: Subsurface Remediation
Application of scientific and engineering principles in the remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. Topics include environmental regulations and toxicology, soil-vapor extraction and bioventing, air sparging, pump and treat, bioremediation, surfactant-enhanced extraction, and permeable reactive barriers. Class project involves design of remediation systems for a hypothetical site. Prereq: EAS 41300 and EAS 44600 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Generally offered every other year. 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS A4170 or B9025: Satellite Meteorology
This class teaches the use of satellite techniques in meteorology and climate research. Prereq: PHYS 20700, 20800; MATH 20100, MATH 20200, MATH 20300. Generally offered every spring. 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS A6700: Weather Analysis
Synoptic analysis of surface and upper-air meteorological observations, including satellite, radar, and aircraft measurements. Diagnostic calculations of vorticity, divergence and vertical motions in mesoscale, synoptic scale, and large scale weather systems. 5 hr./wk.; 4 cr.

EAS A7200: Environmental Project
Advanced-level project utilizes field data to solve an urban environmental problem. Can be taken in the spring semester or in the summer. Also open to postgraduates in environmental fields, by permission. Can be applied to thesis credit. 4 weeks in field plus lab. analyses; 4 cr.

EAS B1000: Structural Geology
Physical properties of rocks in different tectonic environments; deformation; petrofabric analysis. Geotectonics; orogenesis, earthquakes, interpretation of geologic maps and mapping techniques. Generally offered each spring semester, with classes Mon., Weds. Friday. Includes a two-night weekend field trip. 3 lect., 2 lab. hr./wk.; 4 cr., Prereq: EAS 106 or equivalent, Syllabus

EAS B1100: Geotectonics
Detailed discussions of the concepts of mantle convection, continental drift, seafloor spreading, and subduction. Applications of these concepts to selected areas around the globe. The relationship of plate tectonics to earth history and to the global distributions of geologic hazards and mineral deposits. Implications of plate tectonics for other parts of the earth system. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical geology or earth science. 3 lect. hr./wk. 3 cr.

EAS B1300: Earth and Environmental Science Seminar
Presentations and discussions by faculty and guest speakers on current topics in the area of earth and environmental science; can be taken twice for credit. Generally offered each semester. 1 hr./wk; 1 cr.

EAS B1400: Geophysics
This course covers the physical principles that govern the behavior and techniques used to infer the earth’s internal structure, composition, and mineral resources. It provides earth scientists and engineers with the techniques to determine earth structures, locate environmental pollutants, and prospect for natural resources from remote locations. Topics include: Seismology, geodesy, gravity, magnetic, and thermal properties of the earth. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college physics and an introductory course in earth science. Offered most spring semesters. 3 lect. hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B3090: Fundamentals of Atmospheric Science
Generally offered each fall

EAS B3300: Phase I Environmental Site Assessments
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to good commercial and customary practices in the US for conducting Phase I environmental site assessments (ESA) of commercial or residential properties with respect to hazardous substances and petroleum products. A Phase I ESA is the process for determining the presence of an existing release, a past release, or a material threat of a release of any hazardous substances or petroleum products into the ground, ground water, surface water of the property, or into structures on the property. Graduate students receive extensive training on mainstream quality review and assessment methods of completed Phase I ESAs in preparation to enter the workforce in upper level management positions in the environmental engineering consulting industry. 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B3400: Phase II Environmental Site Assessments
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to good commercial and customary practices in the United States of America for conducting Phase II environmental site assessments (ESA). A Phase II ESA is an evaluation process for confirming and quantifying the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products in environmental media (i.e., soil, rock, groundwater, surface water, air, soil gas, sediment) throughout a contaminated site. A Phase II ESA typically includes a determination through field screening and chemical testing of the geological, hydrogeological, hydrological, and engineered aspects of the site that influence the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products (e.g., migration pathways, exposure points) and the existence of receptors and mechanisms of exposure. Students are automatically enrolled in the 40-hour OSHA HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard) certification program which applies to employees who are engaged in clean-up operations that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.

Graduate students receive extensive training on mainstream quality review and assessment methods of completed Phase I ESAs in preparation to enter the workforce in upper level management positions in the environmental engineering consulting industry.

Students are automatically enrolled in the 40-hour OSHA HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard) certification program which applies to employees who are engaged in clean-up operations that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Prerequisite: EAS B3300 or permission of instructor. 3 hr./ wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B4400: Global Environmental Hazards
Study of important, naturally-occurring destructive phenomena, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and coastal flooding. Long-term causes and remediation of these problems. Topics will focus on consequences to urban environments. Generally offered each semester. 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B4500: Hydrology
Introduction to hydrological data, the hydrologic cycle. Precipitation, streamflow, evaporation, and runoff. Emphasis is on their interactions and processes. Prereq: Two semesters of calculus, and two semesters of general physics, or permission of the instructor. 3 lect. hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B4600: Groundwater Hydrology
Occurrence of ground water. Basic equations and concepts of ground water flow. Flow nets. Methods of ground water investigation. Prerequisite: two semesters of general chemistry, and two semesters of entry level earth science, or permission of instructor. 3 lect., hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B4800: Sustainability of Terrestrial, Aquatic and Atmospheric Systems
Overview of critical Earth systems and their interrelationships with emphasis in sustainability; Lecture component places environmental issues in an ecological framework; Hands-on laboratory component introduces concepts and methods used in Earth system analysis with emphasis in sustainable management of aquatic, terrestrial and atmospheric systems. Data set analysis tasks are assigned and student presentations are given throughout this class. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Earth Science, or permission of instructor. 3 lect. 3 lab hr./wk.; 4 cr

EAS B5100: Remote Sensing of Ocean Processes
A comprehensive introduction to ocean remote sensing, covering aspects of both physical and biological oceanography, ocean dynamics, mesoscale phenomena, biogeochemical processes, marine ecosystem resources, human impacts, climate change, and coastal hazards. The course focuses on development of skills in underwater radiative transfer modeling and ocean remote-sensing data analysis and visualization. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Earth Science, or one semester of college biology, or one semester of introductory Remote Sensing, or permission of instructor. 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B6500: Environmental Geophysics
Advanced work in the application of geophysics to environmental and engineering problems. Hands-on work and demonstrations of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetic instruments and techniques. Survey design and execution. Computer analysis of survey results. It is always taught in the Fall and is offered virtually every year. Prereq: EAS B1400 or permission of instructor (in most cases a strong, 2-semester course sequence in introductory physics will serve as a prerequisite). 3 hr. lect., demonstration, or group fieldwork/wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B6800: Physical Oceanography
Principles governing the atmosphere-coast-ocean interactions. The course utilizes the department’s Weather Station and Geosciences Computer Laboratory where oceanographic and atmospheric data are remotely sensed from space. The role of the world’s oceans to current global warming/cooling models will be examined. Topics also include: bathymetric features, origin of the hydrosphere, sea-level change, wave formation, temperature, salinity, and density of the ocean water. 3 lect. hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B7500: Sedimentology
Composition, texture, classification, depositional setting, provenance and correlation of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Study of global and local formations to explore stratigraphic nomenclature, facies relationships and correlation of sedimentary sequences. Course includes a field trip to local outcrops to observe sedimentary rocks and facies and identify depositional paleoenvironments. Four partial exams, one comprehensive final exam and one 15-page term paper. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 3 hr./ wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B8800: Climate and Climate Change
This course links processes and interactions of the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth and their impact on climate and climate change. Topics include the physical principles of climate; climates of the past and present; Ice Age theories; the Greenhouse Effect; and human impact on climate. Prereq: One semester of calculus, and one semester of physics, and one semester of introductory earth science, or permission of instructor. Generally offered each spring. 3 lect. hr./wk.; 3 cr.

EAS B9001, B9002, and B9003: Selected Topics in Earth Systems Science
Current topics and problems with emphasis on aspects not treated in regular courses. Department permission required. 1-2 lect. and/or lab. hr./wk.; 1-3 cr./sem.

EAS B9036: Statistics in Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
Generally offered each fall.

EAS B9103: Special Topics in Meteorology I
Review and critical analysis of selected research publications in meteorology. Students are expected to prepare and participate in discussions on topics of current interest. 1-3 hr./wk.; 1-3 cr./sem.

EAS B9205: Special Topics in Oceanography I
Reviews and critical analysis of selected research publications in oceanography. Students are expected to prepare and participate in discussions on topics of current interest. 1-3 hr./wk.; 1-3 cr./sem.

EAS B9500: Thesis Research
Preparation of a thesis under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Hrs. to be arranged. 1-3 cr./sem. May be taken for total of 6 cr.; Cr. applied on completion of the thesis option.

EAS B9600: Independent Study
Individual laboratory, field, or library investigation of a problem in Earth Systems Science. Approval of instructor required. 1-3 cr./sem. Up to 6 cr. can be applied to master’s degree.